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“mir” or “für mich” when to use the Dative or an Accusative Prepositional Phrase

The other day I was giving one of my German lessons on the run… literally running with my students. The advantages of combining language training and physical exercise are huge. Students combine things (multi-task if you will) and don’t have

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Little differences in German — anders, verschiedene, unterschiedliche

“Ich hätte gern noch ein anderes Bier, bitte.”  This is a phrase that I hear far too often from non-native German speakers. The confusion lies in the translation of the English expression “I’d like another beer, please.” The word another.

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Using während and damit correctly in German

One of the things that I so often claim about the German languages is that it’s very specific and that words aren’t used with as much freedom as in English. I still maintain this, but there are certain words that

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Explaining your actions in German — using um … zu and damit clauses

A post that gets a great deal of attention is the one about how zu is not always used as an preposition, but often with verbs whereby it is followed by the infinitive of the verb. If you haven’t read

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Possessivartikel im substantivischen Gebrauch — Mine & Yours in German

One of the most viewed posts on this blog is the one about possessive adjectives in German (my = mein, your = dein, his = sein, her = ihr …). What makes these a little confusing for many people learning

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German Nouns with N-Declination — Nomen der N-Dekination

Sound. So much of language comes down to sound. What is the easiest sound to make? In German this is one of the reasons for adjective endings being what they are — mostly ending in -en, right?! It’s that same

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German Verbs with Separable Prefixes — Trennbare Verben

You’ve probably had this happen to you before: You’re reading a German sentence and you’re convinced you know what’s happening. The verb is in the second position and then you get to the end of the sentence and there’s a

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spürbar oder merkbar and the German suffix -bar

Last week we started looking at a list of words I was asked about by one of my Stammtisch regulars, Edvin. Last week we looked at the words dauernd and dauerhaft, which brought up the interesting topic of the German

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dauernd vs. dauerhaft and the German suffix -haft

At our Stammtisch last week, one of our attendees, Edvin from Slovenia, asked me if I could quickly clarify the difference between some words. Thinking it would only be a few words, I said sure. He then reached into his

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Skiwortschatz — German Ski Vocabulary

It’s January and in German-speaking Europe that means it’s skiing season (die Skisaison). The word Ski in German presents this very phonetic language with a bit of a challenge because Germans typically say “she” for Ski and often even spell

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Expressing your New Year’s Resolutions in German — Future Tense with Modals

Today is New Year’s Eve (Silvester) and everyone is getting ready for the big party (die Party) tonight. Of course many of you are also putting together lists of your New Year’s Resolutions (der Neujahrsvorsatz / die Neujahrsvorsätze) one of

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