Category Archive for: ‘German Cases’

German Verbs With Prepositions

German Verbs and Prepositions – Learn these together

Last week we looked at German adjectives and the prepositions they take. It’s great to get into the habit of learning certain set phrases, especially prepositional phrases, because this is often in language learning where direct translation will get you

Adjektive Und Präpositionen

74 German Adjectives and Prepositions with Examples

Depending on how long you’ve been following our blog, you might have already read our post on verbs and prepositions. Facebook fans will also be familiar that we often ask you what your questions are, so we can answer them.

Indefinite Pronouns

German indefinite pronouns – not being explicit, maybe in vague

I have often written and still maintain that German is a language of precision. However, when it comes to indefinite pronouns, many are left scratching their heads. First off German has many indefinite pronouns that are very similar in meaning

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4 German phrases that need the dative

As a German teacher there is really only one thing that makes my blood curdle… when students after hearing and reading the phrase “Wie geht es dir?” a million times spew out something like “Wie geht’s du?” Please, please, please

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“mir” or “für mich” when to use the Dative or an Accusative Prepositional Phrase

The other day I was giving one of my German lessons on the run… literally running with my students. The advantages of combining language training and physical exercise are huge. Students combine things (multi-task if you will) and don’t have

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Using während and damit correctly in German

One of the things that I so often claim about the German languages is that it’s very specific and that words aren’t used with as much freedom as in English. I still maintain this, but there are certain words that

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German Nouns with N-Declination — Nomen der N-Dekination

Sound. So much of language comes down to sound. What is the easiest sound to make? In German this is one of the reasons for adjective endings being what they are — mostly ending in -en, right?! It’s that same

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German Cases — Understanding verbs, subjects, and objects

If you’re reading this, you’re under 40 years old, and you’re from an English-speaking country, you probably have at least two things in common with most of the readers of this blog. You’re interested in learning German or improving your

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