Probieren vs. Versuchen – Sometimes you just need to try

Versuchen Vs. Probieren

Probieren vs. Versuchen – Sometimes you just need to try

A few weeks ago at our Stammtisch one of our Stammgäste was ordering a beer from the giant list of speciality brews featured at Fork and Bottle and asked, “Darf ich das Bier bitte versuchen, bevor ich es bestelle?” I quickly pepped up and said, “Also, Du möchtest das Bier erst mal probieren.” And then came the question: “Warum ist es nicht versuchen? Was ist der … oder den Unterschied?… zwischen probieren and versuchen?” So let’s find out when to use versuchen and probieren in German. (By the way… in the questions about Unterschied, it’s der Unterschied because it’s still in the nominative case.)

The confusion starts with people doing one-to-one translations from English. Both mean “to try”. Let this be a lesson. When learning new vocabulary you also need to learn: context (when to use it), collocations (common words used with the new word you’re learning) and register (situational appropriateness).   

versuchen

versuchen (to try)

PronomenPräsensPräteritumPerfekt + haben
ichversucheversuchteversucht
duversuchstversuchtest
er / sie / esversuchtversuchte
wirversuchenversuchten
ihrversuchtversuchtet
Sie / sieversuchenversuchten

**Remember verbs that start with ver- don’t take a ge- in their Partizip Perfekt form

Meanings & Examples:

  • to try something without knowing the outcome
    • Man sollte es täglich versuchen, Deutsch zu sprechen. (One should try to speak German everyday.)
    • Versuchen kostet nichts. (Trying doesn’t cost anything.)
  • to try a profession
    • Erst versuchte er sich als Bäcker, dann als Metzger, dann übernahm er den elterlichen Hof. (First he tried being a baker, then a butcher, then he took over his family’s farm.)
  • to try/taste something like a food or drink
    • Sie sollten auch diesen Wein versuchen! (You should also try this wine.)
  • to lead lead someone into temptation
    • Jesus wurde in der Wüste vom Teufel versucht. (Jesus was tempted by the devil in the desert.)

probieren

probieren (to try)

PronomenPräsensPräteritumPerfekt + haben
ichprobiereprobierteprobiert
duprobierstprobiertest
er / sie / esprobiertprobierte
wirprobierenprobierten
ihrprobiertprobiertet
Sie / sieprobierenprobierten

 **Remember that verbs ending in -ieren don’t take a ge- in their Partizip Perfekt form

Meaning & Examples:

  • to try, to test, to take a sample
    • Manche Sachen muss man einfach mal probieren, um zu gucken, ob sie einem gefallen. (Some things you just need to try, to see if you’ll like them.)
    • Probieren geht über Studieren. (The proof is in the pudding.)
    • Hans probiert sein Glück. (Hans is trying his luck.)
  • to try/taste something like a food or drink
    • Ich würde gerbe einen Schluck von diesem Wein probieren. (I’d like to try a sip of this wine.)
  • to try on an article of clothing
    • Wo kann ich diese Hose probieren? (Where can I try these pants on?)
  • to perform a dress rehearsal
    • Wir sollten die letzte Szene nochmals probieren. (We should try/rehearse the last scene again.)

Probieren also has two versions with the prefixes an- and aus-: ausprobieren (to check out), anprobieren (to try on).

At this point you’re probably thinking, “Christian, why on earth did you correct that poor student. They were right! Look at your explanations.” And this is where I answer, it has to do with the what sounds best. In general, and I know there are areas were probieren and versuchen are used interchangeably for tasting food and drink, but most German speakers use probieren or kosten for trying food and drink. It sounds better and there we have one of the unfortunate facts about language. Even when things are grammatically correct they may not be idiomatically correct. The information above is correct and comes from the authority on the German language, namely the Duden. However, here is an e-mail message I received the day we first posted this article from a friend in Germany showing that, idiomatically most people would not use versuchen for food or drink. The case with Jesus and temptation, is also good, as the example above is a grammatically correct version of what Susann writes, which is more directly taken from the Bible.

Hi ihr Lieben,

ich hab grad mal den Post gelesen zum Thema “versuchen”. Ist interessant, aber bei zwei Dingen sagt mir mein Bauch etwas anderes  Aber vielleicht liege ich ja falsch!

Ihr schreibst….

to try/taste something like a food or drink
Sie sollten auch diesen Wein versuchen! (You should also try this wine.)
–> ich würde beim Essen oder trinken immer “probieren” verwenden oder ist das in der Schweiz anders?

to lead someone into temptation
Jesus wurde in der Wüste vom Teufel versucht. (Jesus was tempted by the devil in the dessert.)
–> heißt das nicht eigentlich: “Jesus wurde vom Teufel in der Wüste in Versuchung geführt”? Oder sagt man das echt so und für mich klingt das nur komisch?

Liebe Grüße nach Zürich
Susann

 

Speaking of trying… We’re trying something new here at Marathon Sprachen too. A video series of conversations with people who have moved to Switzerland. It’ll be in German and subtitled in English. Here’s our teaser (German only, but worth a watch.)

Related Posts:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: