Scheisse — Sometimes a little vulgarity is necessary

Screen Shot 2012 03 18 At 12 00 08

Scheisse — Sometimes a little vulgarity is necessary

Yesterday the world embraced the idea of being Irish, at least for the day as pubs around the world served out copious amounts of Ireland’s most famous export: Guinness. As the green dyed beer, pints of Guinness, shots of Baileys and chasers of Jameson went down the atmosphere in the pubs seemed to get better and better. Simply put pub patrons were drunk. In German: Sie waren betrunken. Of course there are many more words for being drunk in German: besoffen, ölig (AT), alkoholisiert, berauscht, blau, dun, and even fett. In Switzerland we sometimes use the expression Chlapf haben z.B. Nämet mir z`händy wäg,we i än chlapf ha. (Take my mobile away from me when I’m drunk.)

Sometimes you want to describe how drunk someone was or you were so you’ll need an adverb: stark (heavily), sinnlos (senselessly), völlig (completely). According to the Duden the most common accompanying adverbs and adjectives for betrunken are: jugendlich (teenage/young/youthful), bekifft (stoned), alt (old), englisch (English), jung (young), obdachlos (homeless), and aggressiv (aggressive).

And now it’s Sunday and all the partiers are slowly waking and we could say: Es herrscht Katerstimmung (There is a hangover atmosphere.) In German Kater can mean a male cat (tomcat) or hangover. As flashes of last night might start to come back to you there is probably a few choice words that come to mind. In German that word will generally be Scheisse (shit).

Scheisse is one of the most interesting words in German, because it can be applied in so many different uses. It is almost the equivalent of the F-word in English, but while still not being seen as a nice or respectable word, is not as frowned upon as the F-word. In the September 2011 issue of Vanity Fair, Michael Lewis made some very interesting references to Scheisse. I can highly recommend this article. But let’s look at some very common collocations and references with Scheisse.

Scheisse (in Germany still with an ß) allows itself to pretty much be combined with any other word. It’s not an adjective that needs to be declined, but you simply drop the ‘e’ and add the next word z.B. Scheisse + Handy (mobile) = Scheisshandy (piece of shit mobile) something you might say after drunkenly dropping your phone or simply not being able to get signal in the crowded pub your in.

Here are some of the most common Scheiss- combinations:

Nomen:

  • Scheissdreck, der: crap, shit
    • z.B. „Über Scheißdreck reden wir nicht“, antwortete der Lehrer. (We’re not going to talk about that crap,” answered the teacher.) (From an article in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 13.03.2012)
  • Scheisskerl, der: shit head
    • z.B. Verpiss dich, du Scheisskerl! (Piss off, you shit head.)
  • Scheisswetter, das: shitty weather
    • z.B. Was für ein Scheisswetter (What shitty weather we’re having!)
  • Scheissding, das: piece of shit thing
    • z.B. 380’000 Franken für ein «Scheissding» (380,000 francs for a piece of shit thing.) (headline in the Tages-Anzeiger, 21.12.2011)
  • Scheissangst, die: to be scared shitless
    • z.B. Vor Hunden habe ich eine Scheissangst. (I’m scared shitless of dogs.)

Adjektive:

When used in combination with adjectives scheiss- usually works as an amplifier meaning sehr (very). In this respect it is even more like the modern usage of the F-word in English.

  • scheissegal: this is usually used with “es ist mir” and means don’t give a shit.
    • z.B.Es ist mir ehrlich gesagt scheissegal, was er dazu meint. (Honestly, I don’t give a shit what he thinks about it.)
  • scheissfreundlich: used to describe artificial friendliness
    • z.B. Ich mag ihn nicht. Er ist so scheissfreundlich. (I don’t like him. His friendliness is insincere.)
  • scheisskalt: really cold
    • z.B. Draussen ist es scheisskalt. (It’s damn cold outside.)
  • scheissvornehm: very posh
    • z.B. In diesem Kurort ist es scheissvornehm, und teuer, aber es hat geholfen. (It’s f#*king posh and expensive in this spa resort, but it helped.)

Ich kenn nicht deinen Namen Scheißegal Songtext
Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala….

Ich traf sie
Am Strand von Arenal
Die Augen so blau
Die Haare so blond
Und der Hintern so pra-all

Ich gestand ihr meine Liebe
In Palma de Mallorca
Bei Kerzenschein
Ner Flasche Wein
Und nem Eimer Sangria

Doch ich seh sie nie wieder, nie wieder

Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!
Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!

Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala….

Ich traf sie, sie an der Bar vom Oberbayern
Ja ihr T-Shirt war nass
Und wir hatten viel Spaß
Gemeinsam zu feiern

Zu mir oder zu dir?
Oder am Strand unter die Sterne
Du zeigtest mir den großen Bär
Du mochtest mich sehr
Und ich dich ganz gerne

Doch ich seh sie nie wieder, nie wieder

Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!
Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!
Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!
Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!

Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala…. Besoffen!

Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!
Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!

Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!
Ich weiß leider nicht mehr, wie du aussiehst
Kenn nicht deinen Namen
Scheißegal! Besoffen!

Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala…. Besoffen!

Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala…. Besoffen!

Schalalala…. Besoffen!
Schalalala…. Besoffen!

Redewendungen:

  • Das ist eine schöne Scheisse! (literally: beautiful shit!) We use this with a degree of sarcasm like the English “Well, this is just great!” said with sarcasm.
  • Scheisse bauen(literally: build shit) we use this to mean ball or f#*k something up.
    • z.B. Als du weg warst, hat Klaus Scheisse gebaut. (Klaus really messed things up when you were gone.)

So there you have it. I hope that everyone recovers quickly today and that you can use this bit of vulgar German in your everyday life. As with all things vulgar, you need to judge the crowd your with – your audience will determine if what you said was appropriate or not.

If you have any suggestions for future posts let us know via the comments or our Facebook page.

We have courses starting all the time for those interested in learning even faster.

  1. "rub in""rub in"03-23-2013

    Thanks for your personal marvelous posting! I truly enjoyed reading it,
    you’re a great author.I will always bookmark your blog and will often come back sometime soon. I want to encourage continue your great posts, have a nice evening!

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: